Astrology for the 21st Century



:  Home  :  Current Affairs  :  Business  :  People  :
:  Contact  :  Links  :


Bringing the sky down to Earth
Home -> Business -> Stock Markets & OOB Moon

Stock Markets & The Out of Bounds Moon
Published: October 2006

Astrology is based largely on the movements of the Sun, Moon and planets through the signs of the Zodiac. However in addition to this horizontal motion, there is also vertical motion. One way to measure this vertical movement is known as 'declination'. Although declination is much less well known, the two systems - Zodiac and declination - are actually intimately related.

Equator & Latitude

To explain what declination is we start with the Earth's equator. As you know, the equator is a circle around the Earth. Places north of that circle are in the northern hemisphere, and places south of that circle are in the southern hemisphere.

The distance north or south is measured in degrees and minutes, and is called latitude. For instance, the latitude of London is 51 degrees 30 minutes north of the equator.

Declination is exactly the same as latitude but applied to things in space, rather than to things on the Earth's surface.

The Tropics

You've probably heard of the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn, and seen them in atlases and on globes. These are lines marked on maps that show the Sun's northernmost declination (Cancer) and southernmost declination (Capricorn).

On the map they're shown as latitude lines because they're drawn onto the Earth's surface, but they are actually declination markers for the Sun's position in June (Cancer) and December (Capricorn).

We're all familiar with these points by their more usual names: they mark the start of summer and winter, and they are the longest day/shortest night and shortest day/longest night points on the yearly calendar. They are the solstices.

We're also familiar with declination and Zodiac in the form of solar and lunar eclipses. These happen when the Sun and Moon are aligned not just in the Zodiac by also by declination. If the Sun and Moon are aligned in just one of the two systems of measurement, there can be no eclipse.

Degrees & Minutes

The location of these Tropics lines is 23 degrees 27 minutes, rounded to the nearest minute. Often it's rounded further and written as 23.5 degrees. Here is a diagram of the Sun's declination cycle covering a two-year period:
Sun's declination cycle

The blue line across the centre represents the equator. Above the blue line shows the Sun's movement northwards of the equator, and below the blue line shows its movement southwards.

The Sun is never more than 23 degrees 27 minutes north or south. The area beyond these points, shown by the shaded areas, lies the Sun's 'no go' areas. Everything inbetween the shaded areas is within the Sun's declination path, the Sun's declination domain - or inside the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, if you want to think of it in Earth's surface/map terms.

However, other planets do move into this shaded area and that is where things start to get more interesting as far as declination is concerned.

Out of bounds

Astrologer Kt Boehrer was a pioneer in the field of declination studies. She coined the term 'out of bounds' to denote when the Moon or a planet moved outside the Sun's declination path and into the solar 'no go' area.

Apart from the Sun, only Saturn and Neptune never go out of bounds. All other planets - Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Uranus, and Pluto - plus the Moon go out of bounds at some point during their cycles.

Mercury, Venus, and Mars go out of bounds on a frequent basis. The Moon has an 18.6 year pulsation, divided into approximately 9-year halves. It spends around 9 years within the Sun's path, and then another 9 years making regular excursions outside the solar bounds.

OOB Moon

The out of bounds Moon has become a popular declination cycle for astrologers to study. It's said to have relevance to people's emotional life, instincts, and habitual responses.

Interestingly, the Moon went out of bounds on 12th September 2001, a day after the events that precipitated the so-called 'War on Terror', and we have - in September 2006 - just passed the half-way point in the 9-year out of bounds period.

From here onwards we move back towards the 'within bounds' half of the cycle, which will begin in April 2011. This means that the Moon is now decreasing its extreme out of bounds excursions and gradually heading back to within the Sun's declination domain once again. Make of that what you will, hwoever we should exercise caution and not jump to conclusions, remembering that this is just one isolated example of the cycle.

Here is a diagram of the Moon's declination cycle over a two-month period:
Moon's declination cycle

Just like the Sun's declination-plus-Zodiac motion, the Moon's graph shows a straight-forward and simple rhythm, repeating every month ('month' comes from the word for 'moon', because the moon's cycle was used to measure the passage of months). Other planets' cycles are less simple, but their graphs are outside the scope of this article.

We'll now examine some of the world's stock markets to show correlations between stock market movements and the out of bounds Moon.

Stock Market data

The data used for these stock market analyses covers at least 15 years apiece. This is sufficient data to find long-term patterns correlating with the Moon's out of bounds periods. However it also means that there's a trade-off - we can see the longstanding pattern but we can't tell from these diagrams if the pattern is currently being followed in exactly the same way.

That's not important for the purposes of this article though because we're not looking for shorter-term patterns, just longer-term trends associated with the out of bounds Moon.
The latest data has been used, up to and including the first week of October 2006.

The country of the stock market is shown along with the index used. There is then a diagram showing the Moon's out of bounds pattern, accompanied by a line or two of explanation.
In all the diagrams that follow, the shaded areas show the full OOB periods. South is on the left hand side, north is on the right. In the centre, 0 degrees represents the equator.

France - CAC 40

In the French CAC 40 index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during both its north and south OOB periods, however the north OOB period is stronger, and the south OOB period is only slight. 

OOB Moon - CAC 40

Germany - DAX

In the German DAX index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during its north OOB period but not its south OOB period.

OOB Moon - DAX

Japan - Nikkei 225

In the Japanese Nikkei 225 index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during its south OOB period but not its north OOB period.

OOB Moon - Nikkei 225

China - Hang Seng

In Hong Kong's Hang Seng index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during both its north and south OOB periods, although the north period is less extensive than the south.

OOB Moon - Hang Seng

Australia - All Ordinaries (AORD)

In the Australian All Ordinaries index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during its south OOB period but not its north OOB period.

OOB Moon - AORD

Netherlands - AEX

In the Netherlands' AEX index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during its south OOB period but not its north OOB period.

OOB Moon - AEX

Spain - IBEX 35

In Spanish IBEX 35 index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during both its north and south OOB periods.

OOB Moon - IBEX 35

Switzerland - SMI

In the Swiss SMI index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during its north OOB period but not its south OOB period.

OOB Moon - SMI

Singapore - Straits Times

In the Singaporean Straits Times index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during its north OOB period but not its south OOB period.

OOB Moon - Straits Times

Belgium - Euronext Bel-20


In the Belgian Euronext Bel-20 index the OOB Moon has a predictable pattern during its north OOB period but not its south OOB period.

OOB Moon - Euronext Bel-20

Conclusion

This article has hopefully provided a brief introduction to declination and shown how the Moon's out of bounds periods can correlate with stock market movements around the world, demonstrating that declination and the out of bounds phenomena are areas worthy of further study.

Applying astrology to political lifeTony Blair, Menzies Campbell, David Cameron, European Union, USA, War on Terror, Uranus in Pisces & Neptune in Aquarius, & more

Applying astrology to business life Euro Currency, NHS, BBC,
USA economy, Ofcom, Concorde,
W Edwards Deming, European Central Bank, Anita Roddick, & more

Applying astrology to people's lives Health, emotional intelligence, zodiac elements, understanding change, Angelina Jolie, Gwen Stefani, Germaine Greer, & more

Astrology for the 21st Century - Bringing the sky down to Earth


Copyright © Astrology for the 21st Century 2004 - 2006. All rights reserved.